Dell Venue 8 7000 Review

Dell Venue 8 7000 is an Android tablet that came back to hurt us positively to 2015, both for technical characteristics MWC, either for a truly high quality construction. This is a “new” product for the European market, but already spotted in September last year on the occasion of the IDF 2014.

Dell Venue 8 7000 Review
Dell Venue 8 7000 Review

The first things that affect positively the touch ‘n feel lighter, made entirely of metallic materials and good ergonomics. The tablet is particularly comfortable to handle, despite being equipped with a display from 8.4 “, thanks to the good work done by Dell to contain the size of the frames. Inside of the shell is the Atom Processor Z3580 (Merrifield) its not very recent, but equally capable of moving to better software platform. Convincing the display not only for high resolution, but also because of a good color calibration and de deep blacks.

Dell Venue 8 7000 has two more ACEs to play to complete the hardware equipment: on the one hand the double rear camera Real Sense which allows shots with 3D effect-camera that adds up to two more traditional forms, one front and one rear-and on the other the digitizer Synaptic, controllable by the Active Stylus (who also used it with earlier Dell models will continue to do so).

Product so excellently crafted, with a hardware rich, but that, unfortunately, will not arrive in our country, in accordance with confermatoci from Dell at the Mobile World Congress. The distribution is planned, in fact, for the UK market and for Germany. Interested users can then start to consider purchasing through parallel distribution channels. It is also conceivable that Dell chose to expand in the coming months the marketing with an updated dl hardware point of view, maybe even with the new X 5, X 3, X 7 SoC Intel Aton presented at MWC.

The technical characteristics of the tablets that include:
  • Z3580 2.3 GHz quad-core Atom CPU
  • Imagination Technologies PowerVR GPU G6430
  • 8.4 display 2560 x 1200 pixel resolution OLED
  • Dual camera rear RealSense (allows you to create 3D effect on photos)
  • Thickness of 6.4 mm

Dell XPS 13 9370 (2018) Review

Dell’s XPS 13 has remained our favorite consumer laptop for the past few years, thanks to its beautiful nearly borderless display, light weight and sleek aesthetic. Now, after multiple generations of sticking with the same chassis, Dell’s premium flagship has a new design with slimmer dimensions and a beautiful white-and-gold color scheme. In other improvements, the XPS 13 9370 ($999 to start, $1,249 / $2,499 as tested) also offers an optional 4K display, a better webcam, support for eGPUs and a cooling system that promises stronger sustained performance.

However, to make its laptop thinner, Dell switched to a smaller battery and got rid of USB Type-A ports. As a result, some users will prefer the older, XPS 13 9360, which is still for sale and is powered by the same Intel 8th Gen Core CPUs.

Design

If you put the last few generations of the XPS 13 in a lineup, you would not be able to tell them apart, unless you looked at the CPU sticker on the deck. However, the XPS 13 9370 stands out with its new, optional gold-and-white color scheme, along with a slightly slimmer and lighter profile. Dell also sells the 9370 in the XPS 13’s traditional silver-and-black aesthetic.

Though it costs a little bit more ($50 extra on the base model), you’ll definitely want to get the white color, because it’s just plain stunning. The lid and bottom are made from gold-colored aluminum, while the white sides and deck are fashioned from woven crystalline silica fiber.

The deck’s weave-like texture adds an air of sophistication and felt good against our wrists, though not quite as comfy as the soft-touch carbon-fiber deck on older XPS 13s and on the silver model.

No matter which color you choose, the XPS 13 is a little bit slimmer and lighter than its predecessor. The XPS 13 9370 weighs just 2.65 pounds and is a mere 0.46 inches thick at its thickest point (0.3 inches at its thinnest). The last generation XPS 13 9360 weighs 0.13 pounds more and is 0.14 inches thicker. HP’s Spectre 13 is even svelter, weighing 2.4 pounds and measuring 0.41 inches thick. The Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon tips the scales at 2.49 pounds, but is 0.6 inches.

Ports

Unfortunately, when slimming the XPS 13 down to 0.46 inches, Dell had to ditch the standard, USB Type-A ports and full-size SD card reader that appeared on all the previous generations. On the left side of the XPS 13 9370, you’ll find two Thunderbolt 3 ports, which can charge the laptop or connect to high-speed peripherals. There’s also a Noble lock slot and a battery gauge, which shows the charge level on a series of five white lights.

On the right, you’ll find a 3.5mm audio jack, a microSD card slot and a USB Type-C port, which can output DisplayPort video. Both the Dell XPS 13 9360 and ThinkPad X1 Carbon have standard USB ports in addition to the Thunderbolt 3, while the HP Spectre 13 also lacks USB Type-A connectors.

In a major improvement over the XPS 13 9360, the 9370’s Thunderbolt 3 ports support four-lane PCI connections so you can use the laptop with an eGPU (external graphics card) that enables serious gaming. Prior models had only two lanes of PCI connected to their Thunderbolt 3 ports, so they couldn’t work properly with external graphics. We tested the XPS 13 9370 with an Aorus Gaming Box 1070, and it worked.
Display

The XPS 13 9370’s 13.3-inch, InfinityEdge display has bezels that are 23 percent thinner than the almost nonexistent borders on the XPS 7360. Because there’s virtually no frame around the top and sides of the screen, images just seem to pop more.

We tested the Dell XPS 13 9370 with both a 3840 x 2160 (4K, Ultra HD) touch screen and a 1920 x 1080 non-touch screen. Both models offered impressive brightness, color quality and sharpness, though the 4K screen was noticeably better. When I watched the 4K movie Tears of Steel, the neon pink and green lights impressed on both displays, but were richer on the Ultra HD panel. Fine details, such as the wires on a robot’s body and the wrinkles in a character’s jacket, stood out on both panels, and colors stayed true, even at 90 degrees to the left or right.

According to our light meter, the XPS 13 9370 with 1080p screen achieved an impressive mark of 372 nits, while the model with the 4K panel blew us away with 415 nits. Both numbers are significantly higher than the ultraportable laptop category average (290 nits), the X1 Carbon (275 nits) and the HP Spectre 13 (247 nits). The XPS 13 9360 with 1080p screen scored a similar 368 nits.

The 1080p screen on the XPS 13 9370 reproduced an impressive 117 percent of the sRGB color gamut, but the 4K panel was much more vibrant, hitting a full 130 percent. Both numbers compare favorably to the category average (105 percent) and the ThinkPad X1 Carbon (104 percent with 1080p screen). But the 1080p panel is only 5 to 6 percentage points ahead of the XPS 13 7360 (112 percent) and the Spectre 13 (111 percent).
Audio

The XPS 13 9370’s side-mounted speakers deliver audio that’s loud, but rough around the edges. When I played AC/DC’s “Back in Black,” the music was boisterous enough to more than fill our lab, but the guitar and drums were a little harsh and tinny. The pre-loaded Waves MaxxAudio software allows you to fine-tune the equalizer. Disabling MaxxAudio, which is on by default, made the music sound hollow and distant.

Dell XPS 13 (2017) Review

Dell’s XPS 13 has been our favorite laptop overall for the past couple of years, thanks to its light weight, long battery life, beautiful InfinityEdge screen and premium design. To keep up with the times, Dell has upgraded its 13-inch flagship with Intel’s new 8th Gen Core (aka Kaby Lake R), quad-core processor platform. Though the new, $1,299 model is otherwise no different from the 7th Gen-powered XPS 13 that Dell continues to sell, it offers much stronger performance and longer battery life while maintaining all the features that make this the best consumer laptop you can buy.

Design

Dell hasn’t changed the design on the XPS 13 in a few years, but there’s a lot to like about the aesthetic. The lid and bottom surface of the laptop are made from CNC machined aluminum that’s either silver or rose gold, depending on which color you choose.

The sides, back hinge and deck are made from a luxurious, soft-touch carbon fiber. I particularly like the deck, which has a subtle crosshatch pattern and a palm rest that’s one of the softest and most comfortable I have ever used.

The screen uses Dell’s famous InfinityEdge display, which has almost no bezel at all on the sides and top but places the webcam below the screen. The hinge that moves the lid is one of the strongest and tightest I’ve ever seen, which gives the laptop a high-quality feel but also requires two hands to open.

At 2.78 pounds and 11.98 x 7.88 x 0.6 inches, the XPS 13 is remarkably light and compact. Competitors such as Apple’s 12-inch MacBook (2.03 pounds, 0.52 inches thick) and Asus’ ZenBook 3 Deluxe (2 pounds, 0.47 inches thick) are even svelter, but both have smaller screens and fewer ports. Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Carbon (2.49 pounds, 0.6 inches thick) has a larger footprint to accommodate its 14-inch screen, but it, too, weighs less than the XPS 13.
Ports

Unlike competitors that prioritize thinness over functionality, Dell outfits its lightweight laptop with a full array of useful ports. On the right side, you’ll find a USB 3.0 port, an SD card reader and a Noble lock slot. A Thunderbolt 3 port, a second USB 3.0 port, a proprietary charging connector and a 3.5mm audio jack live on the left side. Next to the audio jack, there’s a battery meter button and five lights that can show you how much juice you have, even when the system is off.

The Thunderbolt 3 port is particularly helpful, because it allows you to charge the laptop, output to multiple monitors and connect to high-speed USB-C and Thunderbolt peripherals over a single wire.

Unfortunately, the XPS 13’s Thunderbolt port supports only two PCI Express lanes rather than the four you get on other laptops, so Dell’s system doesn’t support eGPUs. (You can use some of them after bypassing a warning, but they run at lower speeds.)
Display

The XPS 13’s base-level 1080p, nontouch screen offers richly colored, detailed images and extremely wide viewing angles. When I watched a trailer for Thor: Ragnarok, shades like the purple in a statue and the mint green in Thor’s armor really stood out. The matte surface of the panel made fine details, such as Bruce Banner’s stubble,really sharp. Having almost no bezel on the sides and top of the screen also helps improve the experience.

Because the panel doesn’t reflect a lot of ambient light and the screen is so bright, viewing angles were some of the strongest I’ve seen. Colors didn’t fade at all from 90 degrees to the left or right, and they even stayed true when I moved the lid forward a bit. So, if you’re using the XPS 13 on an airplane tray and the person in front of you leans back, forcing you to lower your screen, you can still watch a movie.

According to our colorimeter, the XPS 13 can reproduce a vibrant 112 percent of the sRGB color gamut, which is more than the category average (101 percent), as well as what we saw from the Lenovo X1 Carbon (104 percent) and the 7th Gen XPS 13 we tested last year (94 percent). The MacBook (117 percent) was a little more vibrant, and the Asus ZenBook 3 (111 percent) was about on a par.

The XPS 13 measured a strong 368 nits of brightness on our light meter. That’s far more luminous than the category average (289 nits), the ThinkPad X1 Carbon (275 nits), the 2016 XPS 13 (302 nits), the ZenBook 3 (309 nits) and the MacBook (340 nits).